Crackling crusty and warm sourdough bread everytime ?

Also known as “refreshing” your sourdough bread, the below tip helps you enjoy warm sourdough bread everytime you prefer it that way.

Sourdough bread – unlike factory made bread – has a longer shelf life and can be consumed warm and fresh tasting everytime.

Example – If you have some left over sourdough bread from today and want to have it tomorrow, what you can do is just wrap it in a cling wrap (thin plastic wrap) and put it into the fridge. Tomorrow, just unwrap it, and you can consume it in a couple of ways. Preheat an OTG to 180 deg C, lightly spray /sprinkle water on the surface of the loaf, and bake it in the oven (until crusty  – may take 10-15 min depending on the oven). Or else, you can make slices of the loaf, and roast it in a pan, butter both sides of the slice and have it.

It tastes amazing. 🙂

PS – Sourdough bread by nature has a good shelf life. Despite not using preservatives or any other chemicals, the shelf life of our breads on the counter is 2 days, and in the fridge is 7-10 days. You can freeze it for much longer periods of course.  🙂

PS2 – We dont recommend slicing the bread before refrigeration/storage.  The breads tend to loose freshness. Only if you are planning to freeze the bread, you can slice the bread, wrap and then freeze.

The Story of Factory Fakir and Sourdough Suzy

This is a story about chemicals used in Factory made breads.. Read on ;-).


This is a story about a little town named “Bread Town”. Far Far away in the middle of somewhere.One of the residents, Factory Fakir had a bread factory just at the outskirts of the town. Rich and Powerful, He was known to produce and ship out breads at the rate of hundreds per hour. His breads were everywhere on the shelf of every market.

On the exact opposite side of the town, Sourdough Suzy had her cute little bakery. Any time you went around there, you were sure to get the faint whiff of a wonderful aroma of baking bread. Outside her bakery was always a line of people waiting patiently to pick up bread.

Continue reading “The Story of Factory Fakir and Sourdough Suzy”